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Site Records

Subterranea Scotia

Ceannacroc Power Station

Ceannacroc Power Station sign

OS Grid Ref: NH 22393 10846 (access tunnel portal)
Date opened: 1959
Date closed : Operational





Water is stored for Ceannacroc at two reservoirs, Loch Loyne and Loch Clunie.

Loyne dam is fairly modest structure, 58ft high and 1,700ft long. It's hard to see - new forestry plantations are effectively screening the dam from the main A87 which runs past it:

Loyne Dam

Photo: Loyne Dam
Photo by: Mike Ross

A closer view of Loyne dam. From here, water it taken (via a small power station built in to the dam) through a tunnel, 7,600ft long, horseshoe in section with an equivalent diameter of 12ft, to the main storage reservoir of the scheme at Loch Clunie. When the photograph below was taken, the Loyne power station & tunnel were out of service for refurbishment, so the surplus water was being released into the river:

Loyne Dam

Photo: Loyne Dam
Photo by: Mike Ross

A beautiful winter day, looking down Loch Loyne to the dam, from a layby on the A87. The large cairn is interesting; it marks the spot where Willie McRae, a prominent Scottish Nationalist, died in *very* mysterious circumstances in 1985. Click HERE to read more:

Loyne Dam

Photo: Loyne Dam
Photo by: Mike Ross

Clunie dam, which provides the main storage for Ceannacroc, is a somewhat more imposing structure - 128ft high by 2,220ft long. It's also relatively difficult to photograph; the topography tends to present few clear views. This is the best view that can be got from the main A87 road:

Clunie Dam

Photo: Clunie Dam
Photo by: Mike Ross

Behind the dam now, and looking across the reservoir. The small building is the gatehouse for the outfall of the tunnel bringing water from Loch Loyne:

Clunie Dam

Photo: Clunie Dam
Photo by: Mike Ross

Adjacent to the near end of the dam are two buildings with the A87 running between them. The nearer one is the gatehouse, the further one is the screenhouse. They each have shafts running down to the tunnel below:

Clunie Dam

Photo: Clunie Dam
Photo by: Mike Ross

Closer view of the gatehouse, with the door open and one of the gates visible:

Clunie Dam

Photo: Clunie Dam
Photo by: Mike Ross

A closer view of the screenhouse, with refurbishment in progress:

Clunie Dam

Photo: Clunie Dam
Photo by: Mike Ross

Inside, the screen shaft is full of scaffolding:

Clunie Dam

Photo: Clunie Dam
Photo by: Mike Ross

But it's still (just) possible to get a view down the (very steamy) empty shaft - you can see the screens, and the wet floor gleaming far below. Normally this is all full of water of course:

Clunie Dam

Photo: Clunie Dam
Photo by: Mike Ross


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Last updated 6th May 2006
Style 1998-2001 Subterranea Britannica

Words and images 2006 Michael J. Ross.