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Subterranea Scotia

Nant Power Station - Tailrace

Nant Power Station sign


The tailrace from Nant is a tunnel, 2000ft long, mostly unlined, followed by 700ft of concrete aqueduct, consturcted by cut & cover, which dicharges into Loch Awe.

The first place the water is seen again, after the draft tube stoplog chamber, is the end of the 2000ft tailrace tunnel. Beside the main road along Loch Awe, not far from the turn-off to the power station, is a nondescript enclosure:

Nant power station - Interior

Photo: Nant power station - Tailrace
Photo by: Mike Ross


Closer inspection shows concrete slabs covering an opening:

Nant power station - Tailrace

Photo: Nant power station - Tailrace
Photo by: Mike Ross


Looking through the openings reveals that the concrete slabs are covering a significant shaft, with water surging and stiring at the bottom. This marks the end of the tailrace tunnel, and the start of the cut and cover aqueduct. The latter runs beneath a field on the other side of the road, towards the loch...

Nant power station - Tailrace

Photo: Nant power station - Tailrace
Photo by: Mike Ross


...where it finally discharges.

Nant power station - Tailrace

Photo: Nant power station - Tailrace
Photo by: Mike Ross


A simple flap gate controls the water, and allows the tailrace to be closed-off from the loch, and dewatered.

Nant power station - Tailrace

Photo: Nant power station - Tailrace
Photo by: Mike Ross


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Last updated 5th March 2003
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